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Video

Promoting disability inclusive humanitarian action - the case of the Horn of Africa food crisis

Transcript

MAIN TITLE
Promoting Disability-Inclusive Humanitarian Action:
the Case of the Horn of Africa Food Crisis
 
 
SEGMENT 1 TITLE
Including Persons with Disabilities in Emergency Relief Activities

Linda Mwania
Communications Manager
CBM East Africa
CBM is an international Christian disability and development organisation and our mission is to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities and those at risk of disability in the poorest communities of the world. And one of our core values is building an inclusive society and we aim to see inclusion in every aspect of development, that people with disabilities are included in mainstream development.
Within their regular life people with disabilities tend to be isolated, to experience social isolation, they tend to be affected by poverty, they tend to be affected by discrimination. In time of an emergency this increases their vulnerability in the sense that you might find that there is limitation for people with disabilities to access emergency response services because of difficulties with mobility, difficulties with hearing and seeing, difficulties with being able to move around as other community members have been able to do. So children with disabilities that are not in school will not be able to access or benefit from school nutrition programmes.
And so the issue of vulnerability makes inclusion the way to go when it comes to addressing an emergency response.
TRANSITION SHOTS OF DRY MAIZE AND UPSOUND OF MUSIC
 
Caroline Mukami Muguna
Programme Coordinator
Diocese of Meru / SPARK
The situation during the emergency was very bad. Children with disabilities suffered the most and also the women.
When the relief food came from CBM we organised the people and there was community targeting for the people who are most vulnerable.
The community didn’t even know that people with disabilities were there.
They only knew very few and when the targeting was done the people with disabilities were left out.

Lucy Makena
Beneficiary, Meru
At the time of the hunger I received food from SPARK. They gave me seeds and they built a house for me.
They also provided me with farm tools and I have received a solar lantern to be used in the house. SPARK even installed a water tank and gave me special chairs for my children.
Up sound of music

Geoffrey Kithaka
Head Teacher, Nariango Primary School, Tharaka Nithy County
The absenteeism of the pupils was very high, especially the pupils with disabilities because there was no one to bring them to school. We were lucky to have a good cooperation with SPARK.
 
They gave us food and we were able to bring back the children to school.
There was no longer malnutrition as it was earlier discovered by the Ministry of Health in this place.
The health of the pupils was really improved.
Upsound of music
TC Walter S. Odhiambo
Walter S. Odhiambo
Chief Executive Director
The Association for the Physically Disabled of Kenya
During the food crisis the specific activities that we partnered with CBM to provide included the identification of persons with disability, assessment of persons with disability, the medical assessments and provision of mobility aid because we realize that
mobility is a big challenge, to enable most persons with disability to reach emergency response centres.
Upsound of music and ambient sound

SEGMENT 2:
WORKING TOGETHER TO MAINSTREAM DISABILITY IN emergency response
(change of music)
 
Linda Mwania
Communications Manager
CBM East Africa
In a time of emergency response CBM will work with two main kinds of partnerships. In the first instance we would work together with our implementing partners, existing partners that are already working in the affected area to meet the immediate needs of affected community. But as a second step to that we also begin to look at new partnerships with mainstream humanitarian organisations and encourage them to include people with disabilities within their own emergency response. In this way it helps CBM multiply the scope of assistance to people with disabilities within the area.
 
TRANSITION SHOT A/V WITH FACILITATOR
He is asking if the government could employ interpreters in these different offices so that when the deaf come there their problems are listened to.

Lucy Dickinson
Humanitarian Affairs Officer
UN OCHA
Throughout some of the recent emergency responses in Kenya it has highlighted the fact that
there is a lack of systematic integration of the consideration of needs of the disabled and other vulnerable groups in emergency response.
 
Moving forward I think our next step is to look at training and a more technical approach and we hope to be able to pool our resources with CBM and with other interested parties to roll out a comprehensive set of trainings for partners operating in the field.
TRANSITION SHOT MAN TAKING NOTES AT TRAINING AND UPSOUND OF MUSIC

David Munyendo
Regional Emergency & Recovery Coordinator
CBM East Africa
CBM in partnership with the Kenya Red Cross Society, Merlin, Oxfam Intermón and then the local partners are implementing a project on mainstreaming of disability in emergency response. The aim of this project is to ensure that persons with disability are identified as a vulnerable group
and are included in all interventions during emergency response.
TRANSITION SHOTS OF LINDA MWANIA TAKING NOTES DURING HOME VISIT AND CBM CAR PASSING BY ON DUST ROAD ON MUSIC UPSOUND

Chip Barnett
Country Director
Merlin, Kenya
With CBM when the project started we discovered already 500 people just on a rapid assessment and we expect there is thousands more. So we will provide services to them, assistive devices, treatment referrals when necessary.
Moreover we found in this rapid assessment that there is a lot of discrimination against people with disabilities. Between a quarter and a third of the people we found, there is 500 people, reported experiencing abuse. So we are doing a lot of awareness raising in communities, working not just with people with disabilities but
with the broader community to make them understand what
people with disability have to go through whether it is physical or visual or hearing.
 
David Munyendo
Regional Emergency & Recovery Coordinator
CBM East Africa
Disability is now becoming a human rights issue as specified within the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability.
It is now a requirement that in all situation of risk and emergency response the issue of disability must be taken seriously and it means that all the players within this field have to make sure that all services,
all their programmes and all the interventions are inclusive.
TRANSITIONSHOT CLOSE UP ON SMILING CHILD (WITH DISABILITY) AND UPSOUND OF MUSIC
 
SEGMENT 3
Building Resilience:
Investing for the Future

Linda Mwania
Communications Manager
CBM East Africa
Looking at the magnitude and the pattern of past emergencies around the world, when CBM engages we seek to engage in a way that will bring mid to long term solutions to the affected communities,
and what this means is that in addition to
coming together with the community to meet the immediate needs in a time or in the wake of a disaster
we are also saying that we want to walk together with these people with disabilities, with these communities to help rebuild their lives and in addition to that to become better prepared to face future emergency situations and to equip and enable them to actually be more secure and less vulnerable should a calamity of such magnitude come again.
TRANSITION SHOT OF SHAKING HANDS BETWEEN CBM STAFF AND TURKANA BENEFICIARIES AND UPSOUND OF MUSIC
 
Jospeh M’Eruaki
Social Development Director
Diocese of Mery
With CBM we have initiated some of the activities, for example we have been supporting the communities when it was very critical with some food aid and those communities who are assisted
we are supporting them to build the structures at the household level. Like activities that support the soil and water conservation. We have supported some communities to buy some goats and poultry. These also do well in these dry areas, because they produce early, they are not very demanding, they are also able to support the resilience of the households.
We have also other initiatives like the introduction of the greenhouses this is where we have supported some groups to have the greenhouses, where they can grow some high value crops, some vegetables which they can access the food and then the surplus they can sell and also get some income. And in a way again that is a way also of improving the resilience of the communities and they can be able to have food even when it is dry.

TRANSITION SHOT TOMATOES ARE GIVEN TO CHILDREN AND UPSOUND OF MUSIC

Alice Igoki
Chairlady Mwigiki
Mothers’ Group, Meru
We formed a group and we decided to farm together so to earn an income that would help us to take care of our disabled children by meeting their needs, be them clothing, medicines or school fees.
Currently SPARK is looking for a piece of land where we will farm. If we will have a surplus we will be able to store or use it in the community.
 
That is the help we are getting from SPARK and we are very happy.
 
Caroline Mukami Muguna
Programme Coordinator
Diocese of Meru / SPARK
When we came in and sensitised the people, people with disabilities came in big numbers
and then that is when we now assisted them in organising as groups, because that was manageable. And from the groups they were able to now start working together, planning together, and getting a little assistance from SPARK. And for the mothers who had children with severe disabilities, they came together, put the children together, one of them took care of them, while the others went about their work in the farms. So that one really encouraged me also to have even more groups coming up and being formed
so that also the children can have a time even to be changing from their original environments to a different environment. Now the children themselves when they come together, when they are brought together by the mothers, they also try to play with the other children. Like where we have the children with cerebral palsy they try very much to reach to the other child. And also you find that sometimes they even laugh.

CBM response to the 2011 Horn of Africa food crisis.

This video has three parts: Inclusion of persons with disabilities; working with current partners and mainstream organisations; and providing not only immediate relief but also mid to long term solutions.

Articles about this topic

Horn of Africa food crisis

CBM and partners supporting people with disabilities affected by the Horn of Africa food crisis


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